On the Lookout for Inspiration

Almost a year ago, it was time to make some changes and go back to the basics, to take a step back and focus on the little things that make us feel connected. I’m not referring to human connections as this wasn’t an option anymore at the time, but an actual connection with ourselves which we sometimes lose while living in a fast-paced environment.

Almost a year ago, it was time to make some changes and go back to the basics, to take a step back and focus on the little things that make us feel connected. I’m not referring to human connections as this wasn’t an option anymore at the time, but an actual connection with ourselves which we sometimes lose while living in a fast-paced environment.

That’s how I started by picking up one of the books covered in this post, hoping to embark on a journey that would offer some inspiration and motivation. Whether it’s Mark Manson, Thomas Erikson or Vishen Lakhiani, it’s no coincidence that I chose those three books which happen to belong to the same genre.

While one covers the problems of hope and answers a life-long question of “What is happening to the world?”, another one evaluates different types of personalities, clubs them into specific buckets and explains the reason behind the complexity of human communication & interaction. Last but not least, one that unravels the extraordinary ways to unlock your creativity and step out of your comfort zone.

Everything is F*cked, a Book about Hope by Mark Manson

Following his #1 bestselling book “The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck”, Mark Manson presents another masterpiece that gives us perspective about Hope itself during these interesting times. Even though it was published in 2019, its context is more relevant than ever – while everything seems to be better from a technology, healthcare and education standpoint, why do we constantly feel hopeless?

Mark Manson’s psychological research assorted with the philosophical wisdom of Plato, Nietzsche, Immanuel Kant and others, challenges us to be honest with ourselves and helps us go back to the roots of our problems in order to find inner peace and the real meaning of freedom. His colloquial and humorous type of writing creates a bond where I felt like I was sitting in the same room with him and discussing these topics instead of only reading them off the pages.

The book is split into two parts, the first one dissects the interpretation of hope and how we’re drawn by our emotional and logical thinking within society’s cultural and religious constraints. While the second part tackles the formula of humanity focusing on the essence of growth, human’s desperate attempt to always pursue happiness and leading us to the final conviction.

Living well does not mean avoiding suffering; it means suffering for the right reasons.

Mark Manson

Mark Manson’s assertiveness and openness in covering different bold topics will change your outlook on modern-day problems.

I thoroughly enjoyed the second part, it felt like I genuinely connected with each notion, I kept on pausing to reflect on each chapter as some parts of it were a real eye-opener for me.

Without a doubt, this book is highly recommended for those who are looking to get inspired and motivated to be better!

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Surrounded by Idiots by Thomas Erikson

I will start off by saying that this isn’t a self-improvement book solely based on the author’s own life-long experience in human behavior and communication, but it is actually a combination of that along with a behavior assessment tool called “DISC” developed by the American psychologist William Moulton Marston.

I consider myself to be a factual and analytical person, hence, apart from the ironic title of the book, this was one of the main reasons I was keen to dive into this ground-breaking best-seller!

If your job requires you to interact with different teams and people, then you’ve definitely faced many challenges or so-called struggles on a daily basis. The key purpose of this book is to help you understand those who are different than you – supposedly the “Idiots” of the group. I enjoyed the fact that the plot was well-ordered and structured in a way you could easily follow the four personality types and clearly grasp their different characteristics. Nevertheless, this book is recommended to any individual placed in any situation, whether it is within a working environment or just a casual social gathering.

Once you’ve understood what the most important stress factors in your life are, you’ll be better equipped to avoid them when possible.

Thomas Erikson

I can say that the personality profiles were spot on! Whenever I was reading about a specific personality and their behavior, I could easily link it back to people I know. I believe that was the most exciting part of the book which was covered in the first half.

The author merely focused on these personalities which are split into four different colors, but since we are complex individuals who have a combination of traits, thus a combination of colors, I would’ve liked seeing more of that mixture.

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.

The Code of the Extraordinary Mind by Vishen Lakhiani

This book promises to teach you about the tips & tricks of the greatest creative minds. It focused on the idea that regardless of where you come from, you can achieve your goals and have an astonishing life. The author covers various topics from love, education, spirituality, and work, teaching us how to break away from our conventions, bend the rules and thrive on our own.

Besides the book itself, there is an exclusive global learning platform and community available online for people to connect, interact with each other and with the author, discussing different subjects. Living in a time where digital presence is compulsory for any project or company to succeed, I would say it is a nice initiative to help people feel connected.

I purchased this book after seeing a video ad, I should’ve done the proper research instead of trusting the credibility of the ad.

At first, the context of it seemed intriguing, not to mention that after four years, this was the first book I chose to pick up my reading hobby with. You can imagine how high the expectations were!

Out of the four parts of the book, I couldn’t even finish the second one – I would say that there were many useless details and no significant takeaways, which made it extremely difficult and boring to keep reading the same ideas without learning anything new.

Rating: 0.5 out of 5.

These books really put things in perspective and taught me a thing or two about finding my motivation, practicing self-reflection and chasing a challenge that will help me move forward.

If you’ve read any of these books, what was the most interesting thing you learned from them?

I would love to know your thoughts in the comments below!